Wardisms

I know this will be you over the summer!  But I will still look forward to seeing your smiling faces in September! 
Have a fantastic summer break!
Love Mrs W

I know this will be you over the summer!  But I will still look forward to seeing your smiling faces in September! 

Have a fantastic summer break!

Love Mrs W

(Source: sexuallyfrustratedkoala)

What are the details surrounding the creation, launch, and explorations of the Voyager I?
What do you imagine that interstellar space will be like?
theatlantic:

Get Ready, Because Voyager I Is *ThisClose* to Leaving Our Solar System

Last week, in the corners of the Internet devoted to outer space, things started to get a little, well, hot. Voyager 1, the man-made object farthest away from Earth, was encountering a sharp uptick in the number of a certain kind of energetic particles around it. Had the spacecraft become the first human creation to “officially” leave the solar system?
It’s hard to overstate how wild an accomplishment this would be: A machine, built here on Earth by the brain- and handiwork of humans, has sailed from Florida, out of Earth’s orbit, beyond Mars, beyond the gas giants of Jupiter and Saturn, and may now have left the heliosphere — tiny dot in the universe beholden to our sun. Had it really happened? How would we know?
We’re not quite there yet, Voyager’s project scientist and former head of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, Edward Stone, told me. The spacecraft is on its way out — “it’s leaving the solar system” — but we don’t know how far it has to go or what that transition to interstellar space will look like.
Read more. [Image: NASA]

What are the details surrounding the creation, launch, and explorations of the Voyager I?

What do you imagine that interstellar space will be like?

theatlantic:

Get Ready, Because Voyager I Is *ThisClose* to Leaving Our Solar System

Last week, in the corners of the Internet devoted to outer space, things started to get a little, well, hot. Voyager 1, the man-made object farthest away from Earth, was encountering a sharp uptick in the number of a certain kind of energetic particles around it. Had the spacecraft become the first human creation to “officially” leave the solar system?

It’s hard to overstate how wild an accomplishment this would be: A machine, built here on Earth by the brain- and handiwork of humans, has sailed from Florida, out of Earth’s orbit, beyond Mars, beyond the gas giants of Jupiter and Saturn, and may now have left the heliosphere — tiny dot in the universe beholden to our sun. Had it really happened? How would we know?

We’re not quite there yet, Voyager’s project scientist and former head of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, Edward Stone, told me. The spacecraft is on its way out — “it’s leaving the solar system” — but we don’t know how far it has to go or what that transition to interstellar space will look like.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

congressarchives:

The U.S. flag was formally adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. While the first presidential proclamation celebrating flag day was not signed until 1916 and the first congressional legislation wasn’t passed until 1949, Americans still celebrated the birth of our nation’s flag on June 14. In this 1901 cartoon by Clifford Berryman Uncle Sam is celebrating flag day while carrying a large flag and small boy dressed as a sailor.
 Flag Day 1901, 6/14/1901, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 6010370)

congressarchives:

The U.S. flag was formally adopted by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. While the first presidential proclamation celebrating flag day was not signed until 1916 and the first congressional legislation wasn’t passed until 1949, Americans still celebrated the birth of our nation’s flag on June 14. In this 1901 cartoon by Clifford Berryman Uncle Sam is celebrating flag day while carrying a large flag and small boy dressed as a sailor.

Flag Day 1901, 6/14/1901, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 6010370)

(via todaysdocument)

Why was the Brandenburg gate so important to the saga of the Berlin Wall?
ourpresidents:

“Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!”
President Ronald Reagan delivered these famous lines at Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin, Germany on June 12, 1987.
See the full text of the speech and read more about the event here.

Why was the Brandenburg gate so important to the saga of the Berlin Wall?

ourpresidents:

“Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!”

President Ronald Reagan delivered these famous lines at Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin, Germany on June 12, 1987.

See the full text of the speech and read more about the event here.

life:

Richard and Mildred Loving never asked to be heroes of the Civil Rights Movement. But when the state of Virginia had their interracial marriage in its crosshairs, the unassuming, intensely private couple fought back. And on June 12, 1967, they won.
Here, on the 45th anniversary of the June 12, 1967, Supreme Court decision that, in effect, codified the right of men and women to simply love whom they choose, LIFE.com presents a gallery of recently rediscovered Grey Villet photographs of the Lovings, their family and their friends, along with the text of the original magazine story.

life:

Richard and Mildred Loving never asked to be heroes of the Civil Rights Movement. But when the state of Virginia had their interracial marriage in its crosshairs, the unassuming, intensely private couple fought back. And on June 12, 1967, they won.

Here, on the 45th anniversary of the June 12, 1967, Supreme Court decision that, in effect, codified the right of men and women to simply love whom they choose, LIFE.com presents a gallery of recently rediscovered Grey Villet photographs of the Lovings, their family and their friends, along with the text of the original magazine story.

Me missing you!

Me missing you!

Missing You

Hey, my tumblr peeps! I’m missing you! Hope to be back on Monday and I will fill you in on most of the details. Until then, have a great weekend!

If you don’t like what you’re doing, then don’t do it.

Ray Bradbury, rest in peace.

(via @michaelhayes)

(Source: theatlantic)